Commenting on the Commenter

Commenting has become a contact sport on the Internet. It’s a no holds barred zone and one that constantly amuses, intrigues and befuddles.

I used to think of the verb to comment as a context word when reading literature (ex: “I really don’t like the color with your skin tone, it makes you look pasty,” Olivia made the backhand comment like she was discussing the weather instead of the prom dress I designed and sewed myself.)

First, commenting on social media pages in the forms of status updates actually have gone so far as to lose people jobs. I read a statistic that said something like 93% of recruiters search social media pages for potential applicants. Here’s a compiled list of 17 people who lost their jobs due to social media: Facebook Firings.

If you live in the US, you are probably aware the Supreme Court decided gay marriage should be legal in all 50 states. Of course, this hasn’t stopped the raging debate: business owners’ beliefs vs. gay and lesbian consumers. A bakery refused to make a wedding cake for a lesbian couple. When Rachel came home in tears, Laurel jumped on her phone intending to leave a comment on the BBB website (Better Business Bureau). However, she left a comment on the Oregon Justice Department website. The couple stated that they only wanted an apology, but the one comment snowballed and they were awarded $135,000. One comment. To read about this story:  Comment Causes Fine.

There was another movie theater shooting. This time in Louisiana. He committed suicide when cornered by the cops. His online life is the source of major speculation. Apparently, in addition to being bat-shit insane, he was a “liberal” commenter. There’s no doubt he was popular on certain areas of the internet; I’m going to go ahead and predict the Westboro Baptist Church was among his supporters. I have no doubt the police will uncover a dark corner of the internet where this man discussed his plan and was encouraged. Of course, his comments did not lead directly to these senseless actions and I would never suggest that. He was a coward who found a platform online through social media. Here’s his story: Crazy Killer Uses Social Media

And of course, I’ve taken notice lately of the comment sections practically everywhere. Personally I think it’s awesome to see what other people think all over the world! It’s beyond amazing. Commenters link in through their social media or just create a profile for that particular site. I’m a horrible person so I absolutely LOVE all the snarky comments. As I’ve perused the web, I’ve noticed the best (and most snarky) comments usually are attached to the articles that are about celebrities. I’m assured that I am not alone in my amusement by this fantastic segment on Jimmy Kimmel’s Show: Mean Tweets. If you  haven’t by chance see this, I suggest you YouTube it immediately! What a riot! Mean tweets involve celebrities reading the mean things tweeted about them. Hilarious. And of course it’s two-fold Funny. Seeing these famous people read these tweets and react to them is great on its own. But underneath of course is the absurdity of this. Why in the world would these people care what some random tweeter has to say? I kind of have that opinion on all the articles where I see loads of comments. Why comment at all? Why respond to said comment? Now that I’ve been paying attention, the comment section can get hardcore really fast. Arguments break out, gratuitous profanity is used. For what purpose? Why do you want to leave your digital mark on something and then bitterly argue when someone who lives on a different continent than you?  Even if the article involves you personally or your expertise, you wouldn’t be able to comment on every site where the article appears, so that means your comment won’t get through to everyone reading the article.  I’ve never felt compelled to leave a comment after reading something online, but it’s a very popular thing to do if my quick research is any indication. Check out the mean tweets:

I’ve been called cynical a time or two… That being said, social media and commenting in general isn’t always bad. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve teared up when reading an article about a post or a site or someone’s story going viral and the community (in this case the world) rallying around for support. Here’s a great one: Birthday Invite Goes Viral. Social media, for all the bad, can be really good too. Here’s another one I loved reading: Birthday Invite Goes Viral for Young Lady. Of course, there are the horror stories when viral invitations cause a police visit and upset neighbors. I purposefully stayed away from this and from cyber-bullying… More during another post.

Now, before I end this post, I have to acknowledge that blogging is a form of commenting. First, I love comments. When I started this blog, my boyfriend kind of just shrugged and reminded me that there are a million of blogs and mine wouldn’t be advertised anywhere. I told him that I wanted to write just for me. So I created randothoughtsfromme.wordpress.com in April. I started posting last week. Since then, I’ve had a couple of people actually comment on a post. Today, I figured out how to respond. These comments were comprehensive and personal, which I thought was phenomenally cool! I still have no idea how anyone would find this blog (I guess random chance). I’ve done a little random searching of my own, but there is just so many. So thank you to Brittius and hellitemagazine. I’m tech savvy, but not a social media user and not a commenter. The whole hashtag thing still alludes me, I’ve never sent a tweet, and I don’t bother keeping up with the latest platforms like Tumblr or Snapchat… I’m amazed that I got 24 views yesterday! I write for me, but I would be lying if I said I didn’t enjoy looking at the stats page and conversing Brittius and hellitemagazine.

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A Terrifying Tale of (an) American Idiot(s)

For full story, follow this link: #PassItOnChallenge Apparently Kills

We live in an age where technology has irrevocably changed the world. Right now, people carry computers in their pockets in form of smart phones. Teachers come in the form of tablets for kids of all ages. Amazing advances and horrible atrocities too numerous to begin to think about resulted from a series of tubes we called the Internet.

I struggled with this title. I wanted to call it “A Terrifyingly True Tale of (an) American Idiot(s),” but I am hoping in vain that news outlets have overestimated the true effect of social media on this story, though I have a sinking feeling that it’s wishful thinking on my part.

In Chicago… In the United States… A country that is economically developed, a member of the UN, a world powerhouse, three teens are dead due to STDs. Why should that be a big deal, let alone newsworthy?

In 2009, the first sign of a lethal strain of gonorrhea called HO41 was identified in Japan. It’s an incredibly fast killer and resistant to antibiotics. That in itself is scary. Fast forward to summer 2015, three teens in Chicago (two of who knew in advanced they had an STD) are dead now, in part, thanks to social media. In this asinine “challenge,” people who are infected with this strain of gonorrhea are able to get rid of it by “passing it on,” through unprotected sex by effectively giving it to another person.

In an age of infinite information available at the touch of hand (literally for those who own a smart phone), I cannot believe that anyone who is sexually active could even entertain the idea that an STD (or any disease) can be expelled from the body by purposefully infecting another person. That only worked in The Ring. Teens who are capable of following this stupid hashtag trend can sure as hell perform a google search.

According to this story, a 17 year old kid (Shaheed) knew he had this STD and instead of rushing to the nearest hospital, he reached out to his “friends” on Facebook, blatantly asking females unfortunate enough to be on this list if they were interested in having sex. Without a problem, he got a response from a 17 year old female (Jasmine). They were intimate, and 3 days later the young lady was dead. When authorities reached out to the young man’s parents, they found that he had also passed away. Autopsies later confirmed both kids died as a result of the HO41 strain. There’s no indication the girl new about the boy’s status, so this is straight up murder. The young man knew his status and attempted to purge it from his body by infecting her. Jasmine is guilty of letting her hormones control her body and making a poor decision to participate in unprotected sex with someone who cares nothing for her. It’s like Shaheed played Russian Roulette for the both of them with a fully loaded revolver. An apt description is murder/suicide except I can’t get it out of my mind that this kid might have truly believed he could pass the STD on and save himself. Technically that would make him a murderer if he didn’t tell Jasmine the truth about his STD status. Following this twisted logic, Shaheed would have been “cured” after infecting Jasmine. But once “cured,” would Shaheed tell Jasmine what needed to be done for her to avoid death too?

The third teenager, Karen, a 16  year old girl, also reportedly died from the HO41 strain of gonorrhea and she was aware she had an STD. Karen reportedly used social media in an attempt to procure a partner for the #PassItOnChallenge, but failed to find a partner; it appears she died after 3 days as well.

#PassItOnChallenge is the most ridiculous, most ignorant idea I’ve read about, yet two of these teens tried the purge and pass method instead of seeking help or guidance.

And of course, now the CDC is investigating to try to prevent  further spread of the disease (while first found in Japan from a female sex worker, the HO41 strain has been found in California, Illinois (obviously), and Norway according to the article). It has the potential to be deadlier than AIDS ever was and it kills with impunity quickly. Three days… I have a feeling we are going to see a lot more deaths in the upcoming months. Shaheed and Karen had to have been infected by someone else (most likely two someones)… It’s scary to think about, especially if people forgo treatment to purposefully infect others in a badly misguided effort to stay alive.

Doesn’t every generation always say that there are challenges faced by the younger generation that was never even in the peripheral of the older generation? Apparently advanced stupidity is one more for the millennials. I am currently in the 18-34 demographic which means I am technically part of this group, but I’m on the older end of that spectrum. Social media didn’t become a huge thing until I was already in college and we liked to do surveys on our likes and dislikes. The whole hashtag thing didn’t exist (I still don’t understand how it works). I remember high school, and I remember how the hormones raged and the acute embarrassment I felt when discussing sex with my mother when I lost my virginity. But these kids… these kids have so much information available to them. Private and accessible information. Information on getting treatment. 2 of the 3 kids knew they were infected which suggests there was time for them to reach out to an adult for help. It’s antibiotic resistant, not antibiotic immune. One person getting medical help could change this from the #PassItOnChallenge to the #GetTestedGetTreatedChallenge.

Sadly this takes my generation’s penchant for ignorance to a whole new level. Not only did these kids not get help, they actually tried to infect other people, believing they could kill that person or force them to infect someone else while effectively curing themselves. I don’t believe the two teens who knew their statuses were both conveniently psychopaths who wanted to willingly kill someone after intercourse like a damn black widow or preying mantis, so I’m left to conclude that social media has effectively fried their brains, making them incapable of rational thought, or perhaps it has robbed them of their sanity.

There are still debates on whether sex ed should teach protection and safety or abstinence in public schools in the US. I think that question was just loudly answered for us. The coming months will shift the entire sex education paradigm if this stupid social media trend is not quelled. I just hope that a change happens before there are a lot less kids to teach.

I discussed this information with my significant other. When I disgustedly asked him how anyone could be so stupid when all the information is out there and accessible,  he brought up a very good point. While technology has afforded us instantaneous information, it’s not regulated what-so-ever…. Which means anyone can put anything out there whether it’s fact or fiction. Because of this, there is always going to be someone out there who will agree loudly with some of these asinine ideas, even when they’re dead wrong.

The anti-vaccine movement is a perfect (and again medical) example. Vaccines do not cause autism or other disorders, but there is still a huge group of people who will argue otherwise. All these people cannot be incompetent, so we’re left trying to find another answer…. It’s like mob mentality. Even something ridiculous becomes plausible if enough people think it’s true and throw their support behind the idea or if celebrities jump on the bandwagon. We have a whole movement of people putting the new generation at risk of dying of preventable illnesses like measles because they believe what they read on the internet. No matter how many times Jenny McCarthy makes an earnest and passionate speech about vaccines causing autism, the fact remains vaccines don’t cause autism or other developmental delays…This has been thoroughly debunked by the medical community, but there are so many folks who continue to cling to this completely wrong and potentially dangerous idea with Jenny loudly leading the pack. Unfortunately, her ex-boyfriend Jim Carrey still subscribes to this as well… I don’t mean to “pick on” anyone in particular, but these two people are not medical experts. For whatever reasons, Americans really like to believe famous folks… especially when they’re wrong.

Shaheed, Jasmine, and Karen had their entire lives yet to come, but to quote TLC, “three little letters took [them] to [their] final resting place.” I guess I would add three letters and social media took them to their final resting places. Digital mob mentality at its finest. I only hope that three deaths is enough to stop this trend.

It’s senseless and ignorant. No matter how many kids on social media say that the only way to get rid of this gonorrhea is to give it someone else, it will never ever be true. #PassItOnChallenge… #StupidAsHell

I found an article that made me smile. This proves karma exists.

I JUST uploaded a post about killers. I don’t think it was that eloquently written, but my mind is so frazzled sometimes, it’s hard to get it all out in a concise, makes sense kind of way.

ANYWAYS, I’m going to make this short. As I was looking for URLs to use as links for my thoughts on killers, I came across the following link: Dylan Roof…Justice?

The gist of the story is that Dylan Roof was raped in his jail cell. OK, so here’s where people may not like me. When I read this story, I wanted to be horrified and sickened. I wanted to feel a little tug of sympathy for this kid who was raped… Simply on a human level. And maybe I did feel that for a second until I remembered who he was and what he did… Then the article made me…smile. So maybe I’m a horrible person and I have a front row seat to hell, but this kid… this monster deserves that and more every day of his miserable life. I understand prison is no walk in the park, nor should it be since it’s meant to punish, but even a cage is too good for this monster. I hesitate to call him anything else. Person and human don’t seem to apply here.

So when I came across this news article, yes it made me smile. And then it made me giggle after reading the quotes from the monster himself… The picture was just the icing on the cake. I thought about reproducing his quote here, but anyone can follow the link.  It might be bad juju to quote a monster.. I will, however, agree with some of the inmates…They cheered. So maybe this monster has to have surgery and he’s in serious condition AND he’s on suicide watch… Well, some people aren’t meant for this world.. So he should just kill himself and save the taxpayers’ money. That’s harsh and probably really wrong, but that’s why I like America… Freedom of speech.

I just showed this article to someone very important to me and HIM I will quote. He read that surgery was required to, “repair his rectum.” and he responded, “guess that really wrecked him.” That’s why I love this man and we get along so well. It’s a petty reaction, but it feels like a small justice. It proves karma is alive and kickin’.

If you’re looking for a mood booster, check out the link above and the bonus picture. Worked wonders for me knowing that this kid… this monster is not having a good day. Cheers!

Defining a murderer

I’m reflecting on what happened in Chattanooga a couple of days ago. I grew up there and can view in my mind the two recruitment places. I don’t know what to say that hasn’t been said besides it breaks my heart for all involved. When I hear the word Chattanooga, terrorist is NOT the first word I think. I think hot, mountains, southern accents, and sometimes home. I can’t believe that anyone would ever do something like that there. But I suppose that’s cliche… No one ever thinks it will be somewhere they are familiar with or to someone they know. As soon as the name of the killer was released, terrorism quickly followed. As more information has unfolded, I supposed the term may be apt. To be fair, I don’t know much, only what I’ve heard on the news and read on the internet. However, the whole 10 month trip to Jordan does seem suspicious… I suppose you take that information and combine it with Mr. Abulazeez getting let go from his job at a nuclear facility because he didn’t pass his background. Personally, I want to know WHY he didn’t pass and I doubt we’ll ever know. It’s easy to let your imagination run wild. I mean, did he fail because his father contributed money to a flagged cause in the 90s? Sins of the father and all  that… Or did he fail because he posted on some shady website that we’ve never heard? Speculation is endless, but I want to know why. It’s a significant question that I’ve asked (probably too much) since I was old enough to talk. Ultimately, I am only one person and my questions don’t really count for much. Actually they count for nothing as I’m not in a position to ask anyone who would have answers. This situation is personal only on the peripherals as I grew up there. AND ultimately, he’s dead. That’s harsh, but true. He’s gone.

Maybe I like macabre, but killers fascinate  me. I keep thinking about the news and all the world has been exposed to lately. The horrific ISIS massacres to the goings-on of some of the more crazy (I don’t know a PC way to define someone who kills, so that’s the best I’ve got). But when I read about the Chattanooga incident, I thought a lot more about it after learning that my sister, niece, and father who live there were safe. But here it goes:

I really am trying to be objective here… If the gunman would have been white, would the first term to describe him be “domestic terrorist?” No, probably not. But then I think about Dylan Roof and I’ve read words like “racist” and “hate crime.” Or the man in  Brooklyn who killed the policeman; we call him “cop killer.” James Holmes? The mass murderer, the Dark Knight shooter, the crazy guy…

It’s amazing to me the labels that we put on things. Killers are killers are killers. Why is one worse than the next? I’m the first person to admit that it’s terrifying, while being fascinating. I don’t understand the compulsion to do something like this, to anyone. I think that it’s said that there’s not a far leap from suicidal to homicidal. If that’s the case, I wish all these people would have just taken themselves out instead. I know that’s probably the wrong thing to say, but hurting  yourself over hurting other people is always the right thing to do in my mind. I like to binge watch Netflix; recently they added a second season of the A&E show “The Killer Speaks.” They interview folks who are incarcerated for murder. I’m always surprised by these interviews. Surprised because some seem truly normal and because some are amazingly, ridiculously, stupidly arrogant. Murder, it seems, is mainstream these days. So  maybe this whole post is cliche. I want desperately to understand all these people… There’s so many different names for these people like I mentioned above: murderer, terrorist, homicidal, killer, mass murderer, serial killer, spree killer, hate crime killer.

I can google killer and come up with so many people (not pages, people) that I couldn’t even begin to list them all (I’ve linked a few of the pages containing information on people who’ve been mentioned at the bottom of this post). It seems that we do (even posthumously) like to give these people their 15 minutes. It’s scary to be alive today. Maybe it’s always been this way, but now there’s so much access to information that it’s been thrown in our collective face. I think we can take all those words to describe human beings who deliberately take the life of someone else like this: monster.

Unfortunately, we all like a good monster story.

The Domestic Terrorist

The Cop Killer

The Dark Knight Killer (Crazy Killer)

The Hate Crime Killer

Link to “The Killer Speaks”

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